Beyond Vision: Messages from the Holographic Universe

Explore the extra-physical phenomena of the universe in this themed group exhibition.  Each artist in this show presents their own interpretation of how one sees or visually communicates with the paranormal using varied media such as painting, video, photography, sound, and even quilts.

Shannon Benine, Central Light No. 3

Shannon Benine, Central Light No. 3

Shannon Benine uses analog photography to invent new modes of divination while “reconnecting the medium to its past relationship with mysticism and modernist experimentation.” Benine suggests difficult to fathom forms, such as black holes and tesseracts with her striking color photograms. Using simple photographic methods she conveys the very complex with the very simple.

Kimberly Burleigh, Instances 4

Kimberly Burleigh, Instances 4

Kimberly Burleigh creates imagined physics by combining computer modeling and the inherent properties of paint. The imaging tool of the 16th century, paint, is combined with the imaging tool of the 20th century, computers, to forge an image of the 21st.  Burleigh’s use of a liquid medium like watercolor seems appropriate as she plays with the refracted and reflected patterns we have all seen on the bottom of the swimming pool, called caustics. The resulting images seem familiar and also not, like alien life forms or diagrams of quantum fluids.

Caleb Charland,  One Hour with Clock and Candle

Caleb Charland, One Hour with Clock and Candle

What does the shape of time look like? Caleb Charland provides us an image, with nothing more than a clock and a candle. Charland’s photographs capitalize on the uncanny qualities of simple materials. A sparkler held over transfer paper becomes the milky way galaxy, a strobe light becomes an eclipse, and mylar becomes a glowing orb of unknown origin. As he writes, “an energy vibrates in the space between our perceptions of the world and the potential the mind senses,” and his work plays with that in between space. As Albert Einstein once said “The most beautiful thing we can experience is the mysterious. It is the source of all true art and all science.”

Adam Ferriss, Messier 17

Adam Ferriss, Messier 17

Color and pixel distortion in Adam Ferriss‘ work seems to question our perceptions of the world. Distant and gigantic nebulae as captured by NASA’s Hubble space telescope are the starting point of Ferriss’ prints. These deep space images are carefully abstracted to the point where the lines between real and digital space blur. The pixel distortion suggest faulty data from some unknown satellite, yet the blend between image and mark is obviously way too perfect to be machine error. His videos have a similar quality through very different imagery and means. The endless ebb and flow of waves are captured with a tricolor process resulting in a video where multiple dimensions seems to be appearing simultaneously. Click here to see an example.

Christine Gray, Were There Where

Christine Gray, Were There Where

Christine Gray employs painterly technique and abstracted form to suggest entry points into and out of reality. Rocks, neolithic stone monuments, and meteorites are the common subjects of her oil paintings, yet she uses these tangible, solid objects as symbols of the fleeting and impermanent universe. Painted geometric patterns appear as digital noise and represent the possible structure of space. The artifacts and places described in Gary’s body of work act as conduits between us and a reality beyond our understanding.

Jenny Morgan, the featured artist, is a

Jenny Morgan, Power Play

Jenny Morgan, Power Play

figureative painter living and working in Brooklyn, NY.  Her work “formulates a grounded state of hyper-sense while stripping each figure she paints to their spiritual core.” She pushes her medium, oil paint, by additive layering and subtractive sanding and in turn pulls the form away from hyperrealism towards hyper-dimensionality. What at first my appear to represent three-dimensional form, Morgan’s paintings suggest string theory and alternate realities through an apt use art history, the principles design and color theory.

Join us on Thursday, April 4 for an artist talk by Jenny Morgan at 5:00pm in Fulton Hall room 111.

Bill Morrison, Light is Calling

Bill Morrison, Light is Calling

Time, the fourth dimension of our universe, is brought to the fore partly through the use of historic footage, and partly through Bill Morrisson’s pacing, sound, and other cinematic choices. He uses footage from severely decayed nitrate films of the 1920s which heighten the ghostly and ephemeral qualities of his films. The historical takes on a cosmological scope and within his films, and time and space appear to have less definite parameters.

Anna von Mertens, Girl with a Pearl Earring’s Aura after Johannes Vermeer

Anna von Mertens, Girl with a Pearl Earring’s Aura after Johannes Vermeer

Playing off Walter Benjamin’s question of the aura in the age of mechanical reproduction, Anna von Mertens takes iconic portraits from art history and interprets a metaphysical aura for each painting. She paints dye onto fabric to create an aura in the same proportions as the original painting, and then superimposed is a layer of hand-stitching that includes the silhouette from the source painting and the subject’s chakra pattern. The tactile labor of these haunting quilts, question the physicality of objects and their extra-sensorial properties.

Ven Voisey, Ghost Radio

Ven Voisey, Ghost Radio

“Ghosts are everywhere, and disembodied individuals and energies seem to be present in increasing numbers,” writes artist Ven Voisey for his on-going project, Ghost Radio. He explores paranormal phenomena by collecting and collaging true ghost stories and other experiences through conversations, spirit communication attempts, telephone messages, found audio clips, radio technology experiments, and social media sound fragments. Ultimately the material collected is recomposed into an audio installation that drifts between experimental music composition, cut up audio docudrama, and ghost hunt.

The show runs from March 4 to April 6 in the University Gallery with a reception on April 4 at 6pm.

Exhibition catalogues are available through Blurb Books.